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Big day, steroids, horses and Pujols May 20, 2006

Posted by dr. gonzo in Sports.
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A couple things, quickly. Wrote a bit about horse slaughter today, a bill passed by the House Thursday could end the sale of wild mustangs for slaughter by the Bureau of Land Management.

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In other notes, big day for professional sports today.

Barbaro, the Kentucky Derby winner and favorite at today’s Preakness Stakes fractured his leg during the race.

The White Sox/Cubs game resulted in not only a 7 to nothing whipping for the Cubs but a second inning melee touched of by a home plate collision and a Michael Barret right hook.

And, blah, Barry “Steroids” Bonds hit home run number 714, tying him with Babe Ruth for second on the career home run list.

Oh yeah, and Albert Pujols hit a league leading 21st home run today. Update: (5.21.06)- Pujols became the second fastest player to 22 home runs today. He is second to only to Barry Bonds who reached the milestone in 43 games during his 73-home-run 2001 season. End Update.

I am certain this is starting to raise questions in many minds about the legitmacy of Pujols’ stats. Especially, in light of revelations about Mr. Bonds, and other players (including superstars).

Every fan knows that unnatural feats in recent years have been the product of steroid abuse and in many cases those substances weren’t banned by Major League Baseball until recently (2005).

For me, a Cardinal fan, but a baseball fan first, someone on pace for a 79 home run season and 200 RBI season is a bit odd. It makes me want to take a harder look at a person’s credibility.

Sad statement for baseball. Feats and accomplishments that once had a religious sanctity surrounding them are now looked at skeptically and with a cynical eye. Will fans be able to trust any good statistics or record breakers again? It appears more and more doubtful.

Tonight, on ESPN Tim Kurkjian lamented on the sadness that baseball and baseball fans weren’t celebrating Bonds’ accomplishment as much as it should be celebrated. ESPN is really nothing more than a cheerleader for the major professional sports anyway, they always have been. How else could they expect to get large contracts for national sports coverage?

But Kurkjian’s lament was immediately followed by the “you know why” disclaimer, blah blah blah, allegations of steroids, blah blah blah. What does Kurkjian, Bonds, Selig and baseball as a whole expect? Fans aren’t idiots, at least not all of them, can’t really say the fans in San Fransisco aren’t idiots. Regardless, fans are tired of accepting inhuman feats as fact when it’s so obvious that a large number of players either are or have been on steroids. Allegations? Again, we’re not stupid

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